Linguistic Linked Open Data Cloud.

This diagram is automatically generated from the data contained in LingHub, and shows the current status of the linguistic linked open data cloud.

Legend

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Background

The Linguistic Linked Open Data cloud is a collaborative effort pursued by several members of the OWLG, with the general goal to develop a Linked Open Data (sub-)cloud of linguistic resources. The diagram is inspired by the Linking Open Data cloud diagram by Richard Cyganiak and Anja Jentzsch, and the resources included are chosen according to the same criteria of openness, availability and interlinking. Although not all resources are already available, we actively work towards this goal, and subsequent versions of this diagram will be restricted to openly available resources. Until that point, please refer to the diagram explicitly as a "draft"

Availability

The diagram is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) license, you are free to share (copy, distribute and transmit) the work, to develop your own extensions (adapt, remix) of the work, and to make commercial use of the work under the condition that you give attribution as follows:

The diagram is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) license, you are free to share (copy, distribute and transmit) the work, to develop your own extensions (adapt, remix) of the work, and to make commercial use of the work under the condition that you give attribution along the following lines:

  • “Open Linguistics Working Group (2012), The Linguistic Linked Open Data cloud diagram (draft), version of , http://linguistic-lod.org/llod-cloud” (replace with the date shown in the diagram)

In scientific publications, please also refer to the most recent reference publication available at the time of publication as specified below:

  • Christian Chiarcos, Sebastian Hellmann and Sebastian Nordhoff. 2012. Linking linguistic resources: Examples from the Open Linguistics Working Group, In: Christian Chiarcos, Sebastian Nordhoff and Sebastian Hellmann (eds.), Linked Data in Linguistics. Representing Language Data and Metadata, Springer, Heidelberg, p. 201-216.

Links for the current SVG, PDF and PNG versions as well as to earlier versions are provided below.

How to contribute

The current version of the diagram was developed by John P. McCrae, Luca Matteis, Christian Chiarcos, Sebastian Hellmann and Sebastian Nordhoff, however, it is officially attributed to the Open Linguistics Working Group and any working group member can modify it.

In order to add a new data set to the diagram draft, please follow this procedure:

Joint activities

The development of the diagram itself is designed as a joint activity. However, we all do pursue different application scenarios, so that concrete collaborations will normally not involve all contributors to the LLOD cloud, but rather focus on selected resources from the LLOD cloud and how their information can be combined. You can help the community by using the diagram above or extensions of it, on your websites and in your publications, and by mentioning the OWLG. If you need help to devise a description of the OWLG as a whole, you can ask the mailing list administrators to provide you with text snippets.

From time to time, we plan to present summaries of the progress of the OWLG and the LLOD cloud at selected conferences, in journals, etc. We would like this to be written on a really collaborative basis, and any contributor should feel invited to act as a co-author. Normally, we will announce plans for such summary publications by email to the people who committed to provide their data as part of the LLOD cloud.

So far, we have written a few papers that describe the vision behind the LLOD, that motivate the LLOD, discuss representative types of linguistic resources involved for selected examples, and that describe its development until October 2011 (i.e., before the community efforts really began). These are published as a separate part in the companion volume of the LDL workshop, and a concise summarization over these, extended with a focus on resources relevant to the Francophonie, has been submitted to a special issue of the French NLP journal TAL. With more and more people getting involved, and more resources becoming actually available, these publications should be quickly superseded by updated papers written by a larger number of people.

Data sets

In the diagram, every node is linked to a LingHub record describing its status, providing data (samples), etc. (With an SVG-capable browser, you can just click on the nodes.)